Dallas Neighborhoods


Dallas is divided into dozens of neighborhoods, each with its own unique history, culture, and attractions. The most famous quarters include:

Oak Lawn

Located near the city’s downtown, Oak Lawn is a historic center of the Mexican-American community in Dallas. This heritage is on display in the neighborhood’s buildings, several of which bear a characteristic fusion of Mexican and US architectural styles. The area has also become known for the local LGBTQ community, as well as for being the site of the Consulate-General of Mexico in Dallas.

Deep Ellum

Also close to the downtown area, Deep Ellum is known for its diverse artistic and entertainment accomplishments. The neighborhood rose to fame as a center of jazz and blues performance, being home to innovative artists who influenced these music styles throughout the country. The area also has a strong tradition of public visual art, being lined with murals designed by local painters.

Oak Cliff

Beginning as a separate city, this area was eventually incorporated into Dallas, where it played a key role in the town’s musical and performing arts culture. Musicians like Aaron “T-Bone” Walker and Ray Wylie Hubbard and actors like Yvonne Craig and Stephen Toblowsky all lived here. This neighborhood is also the site of the historic Texas Theater, where assassin Lee Harvey Oswald was apprehended after killing President John F. Kennedy.

Lakewood

Located in the eastern part of the city, this neighborhood is home to a number of historic and conservation buildings. On display here are a wide range of architectural styles, including Tudor, Spanish, Four Square, and Mediterranean Eclectic. Lakewood is also the site of the Samuell Grand Amphitheater, which the Shakespeare Festival of Dallas uses for most of its performances.

Bryan Place

Named after the city’s founder, John Neely Bryan, this neighborhood contains the Exall Park Recreation Center, the Latino Cultural Center, and Baylor University Medical Center, and countless other key sites.