Philadelphia Neighborhoods

City Center

The City Center is home to many of Philadelphia's top attractions. The Avenue of the Arts is the arts district that comprises much of Broad Street. Chinatown houses a number of culinary treats and shopping markets. History buffs will love strolling down Elfreth's Alley, known as the "oldest residential street in America," the alley is a National Historic Landmark with a museum and many of the old homes still present on its well-trodden street. The city's thriving French culture is still alive and well in the French Quarter, complete with a Parkway inspired by the Champs-Elysées. Logan Square contains even more Nationally Listed Historic Places such as the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul, the Harris Building, the Wesley Building and the Francis McIlvain House along with the city's business district. You might enjoy a meander through Rittenhouse Square, one of a series of open-space parks designed by William Penn that still stands as one of the most beautiful urban public spaces in the US.


Southwest Philadelphia

Many areas of Southwest Philadelphia were former mills or rural areas that have been turned into residential areas. Many of these neighborhoods are still indicative of the historical architecture that once defined America's birthplace.


West Philadelphia

Perhaps most well-known as the birthplace of the Fresh Prince of Bel Air, West Philadelphia or "West Philly" houses some of the city's most attractive urban architecture. Attractive stucco and stone row houses line the streets of Belmont Village, which is also the home of the Mann Center for the Performing Arts and the Philadelphia Zoo. The Overbrook area has numerous educational building points of interest, while Parkside offers up many excellent examples of Victorian architecture.


Germantown-Chestnut Hill

About eight miles northwest of the city center is Germantown which is a hotspot for colonial-era architecture and historic sites. It was the site of many summer vacation sites during the American Revolutionary War and still retains much of its historic charm and dignity.